User_Name: Fapper
Date: Monday June 30, 2014
Time: 05:41 PM

Messages

I have come to a similar conclusion on the weather. i live in BC and wont be wasting any time going after mushrooms this fall. you wait and see we're in for a dry fall after all the rain we have had so early. if you've been around a while you have seen it dry dry like that before so don't be surprised.! if you have a flexible kind of employment get another idea going now other than mushrooms and if you have a regular job hang onto it. that is all!


User_Name: Ben Bizzy
Date: Monday June 30, 2014
Time: 03:18 PM

Messages

Wow I just pop in to see whatup and vern has posted his comments on the weather. I'm not getting a clear picture but kindof got the general idea. Your the man! Thanks dude!


User_Name: Lobo
Date: Monday June 30, 2014
Time: 02:11 PM

Messages

Hey that is great Daddy; after those years in Italy any morel must feel like Christmas. I sure do miss foraging and those by-gone years selling at the Ketchum & Boise farmers markets, meeting and educating was loads of fun. But that was years ago and others have taken advantage of markets I opened when I went on to greater things. If I ever learn to walk on uneven ground again I will be foraging again for sure.


User_Name: Shamrocky
Date: Monday June 30, 2014
Time: 01:15 PM

Messages

We never get to have any fun. Go to sleep at midnight, get up and 1 am and drive off down the highway, then go pick mushrooms for 16 straight hours and come back to the car soaking wet and bleeding from our toes. Then if we are lucky we can eat a can a beer for dinner right before bed time, and do it all again the next day. Last year I saw big foot walking around in my patch but I was too busy picking to say hi or play any good pranks on him. I thought I was doing this to also admire the wildlife and the scenery and the fresh air? Nope. It's just constant drudgery. I'll see you down the trail, I'll be the guy collapsing under the weight of 100 lbs of chanterelles.


User_Name: Kim
Date: Monday June 30, 2014
Time: 11:05 AM

Messages

Ang, will you call me? Geez Vern you sure don't make it sound very fun! All work and no play makes Kim a bored girl!


User_Name: Vern
Date: Monday June 30, 2014
Time: 10:16 AM

Messages

One final thought for those who think they would like to be professional or commercial mushroom harvestors - THIS IS HARD WORK!!!!! The real pro's are a very diverse and highly motivated lot. Most have many years experience. Many are hardcore outdoorsmen and women with a very tough competitive spirit. They never quit, rarely take days off, usually only from exhaustion, and will literally work themselves and everybody else till they drop. They are ruthlessly efficient. The chances are not good that the wanna be can compete with them. Most often the poor wanna be's will stumble across what was a real good spot that would have been great, IF a pro had not already been there and cleaned it out!


User_Name: Vern
Date: Monday June 30, 2014
Time: 09:31 AM

Messages

Ok folks, After using my tried, true, and mostly reliable (lol) methods in further study of the coming weather situation, and with the aid of my top secret formula to calculate the many variables, and a little help from the Wiccans, here's my fall forecast: From Canada to California the season will be VERY SPOTTY for all the edible mushrooms no matter where you are. Some areas that are known to produce commercially viable amounts will get plenty of rain and others will get very little to none. Some areas will have favorable conditions generally, including favorable temperatures for sufficient commercial production. others will be a disappointment. There wont be a massive Chanterelle harvest across a huge geographic area like last fall so it's best to get that out of your head now and plan accordingly. On the plus side because the chanterelle harvest will be smaller than last year, prices will be up, for those who harvest and sell mushrooms themselves. Those people who sell to big companies/field buyers will be at risk, as always, of every kind of lame ass bs story known to man as an excuse why the price is down so keep that in mind. In the case of Chanterelles specifically, it's real easy to work all day for nothing if you aren't careful. Anyone wanting to pick commercially will have to be mobile and able/willing to travel out of they're usual range in the event that area doesn't produce. This is always iffy...Since your basically looking for new patches in unfamiliar locations and that consumes time...and therefore costs money, since for the commercial mushroom harvester TIME IS MONEY! Poor time management will increase expenses and burn and waste the limited time you have before the snow, or freezing temperatures come.. Professionals already know all of this but newby's take heed - You cannot run all over the countryside hoping to find a hot patch here or there in unfamiliar area. No amount of happy thoughts or optimism can save you from the cost of fuel and other operating expenses. It's just simple fact. DO NOT strike out with the idea of "getting lucky" and finding the motherload. It wont happen, and even if it does, you will have surely burned a lot of gas and wasted a lot of time that cannot be recovered before it does, greatly reducing the monetary benefit of said motherload even one is eventually found. The pros will do well this fall in some areas, depending on how they market their take.. But not the people who just think they are pros, they will suffer just as they did during the spring morel/bolete season. One more thing - The weather will most likely be eratic across the entire area, there will be swings from hot to cold and back again making it very difficult to calculate how long the season in any particular area will last but this is life now, compliments of climate change-global warming and here to stay. Get used to it. Good luck to all who dare!


User_Name: some picker
Date: Monday June 30, 2014
Time: 06:26 AM

Messages

High line... in fishing and shrooming, means the person who brought in the most mushrooms. There are lots of pictures on this website of smiling pickers with only a few or one pine. Splatting mushrooms on the ground as a means of identification is ridiculous.


User_Name: visioncreation
Date: Monday June 30, 2014
Time: 05:50 AM

Messages

It is with some amusement I read of people chastising people for their stupid mushroom stunts and the arguments that ensue. I have taken my share of chances with wild mushrooms, including some that made me sick, but NEVER with Amanita family. I am still alive, ( at least last time I checked) and follow some really simple rules! 1 Does it look good? 2 Does it have wild and violent colors? 3 Does it smell good? 4 Are there signs of animals eating them? 5 What do they taste like... tiny bite.. raw... aftertaste... spit it out wait.... 6 If and only if all these check out do I cook any and then have a small mouthful and write all findings down as I go....& if no upset stomach occurs in 6 hours, I consider it safe to consume them.... Now all this being said, I learned this from an 80 year old lady of Russian heritage 3 generations in Canada who is an avid mushroomer. I also augment this info with several good books and will be the first to say I am not a mushroom guru. I feel when I quit learning and know it all, I am on death's door. I do occasionally pick for profit... if it is profitable???? but I do not get 'mushroom fever' and go spend $ I do not have, to try to make easy money! Easy money , when it comes must be seized and the rest of the time go to work like normal and enjoy life. catch a fish or garden or what ever turns you on. Cheers, Happy picn


User_Name: Daddy in Wa
Date: Monday June 30, 2014
Time: 12:07 AM

Messages

After three years I picked some morels. At about 4000 feet, most of them only good for the dryer. But most satisfying just the same. Happy to hear you are getting around better Lobo.


User_Name: LivinTheLife
Date: Sunday June 29, 2014
Time: 10:14 PM

Messages

I meant I saw and photographed Oregon White Truffles on sale as Italian White Truffles, not French Black Truffles. Not really a fatal mistake but bad business none the less. Hey, Dread, what city are you getting $20 a pound for matsutake? For all you pick? How much is that? Hey, Vern and Woody, where do you guys live? Do you really have time to hunt mushrooms? You seem to be spending a lot of time at the computer for some reason.


User_Name: LivinTheLife
Date: Sunday June 29, 2014
Time: 09:42 PM

Messages

Hey, some picker, got a burr in your boot? You create this warm emotional picture of toothless pickers with bald tires happy to get whatever they are given just to tell me I am bragging and greedy? That is a crappy argument based on flawed reasoning. I want to see your pics of old men that smile when they can no longer "high line," whatever that is. If you can't produce them, you are a liar. Like that? Kinda stops any discussion, doesn't it? Pics of the fake truffles offered at the farmers market, I got 'em. I should have recorded the owner of the booth arguing how they looked just like the picture and the aroma had yet to "come up." Pics of Oregon Winter White Truffles on sale at a local store marked as French Whites, I got 'em. The rest happened before cell phone photos. If I hadn't splatted the two baskets of Destroying Angels as I explained to the chanty picker that one characteristic of matsis is they explode or bounce as opposed to splatting, perhaps you would have your evidence of the stupidity. Picking a poor pop in a low market is almost as foolish as selling destroying angels for matsutake and will leave you toothless with bald tires .


User_Name: Ron
Date: Sunday June 29, 2014
Time: 08:26 PM

Messages

Ha I'm down with the coffee and bong hits part, Wine and bong hits too! Just ask my wife who would say that full grown man she knows turns into a giggling kids with any of the above mentioned added to his-self! And no I don't eat bad mushrooms.


User_Name: some picker
Date: Sunday June 29, 2014
Time: 05:51 PM

Messages

Pickers with bald tires, missing teeth, a day late, a dollar short, in the rain, forever, working and loving it, old men no longer high lineing but still smiling. Low prices and a poor pop separate those that love mushrooms from those that love money and bragging. and to, living the life, can you document your accusations against pickers? or a single case of any mushroom related death that involved a commercial picker or buyer? i don't think so.


User_Name: Angie
Date: Sunday June 29, 2014
Time: 01:03 PM

Messages

Hey dudes just chicking to see what kimmy has had to say lately..One thing I've noticed is it gets kind of boring around here when nobody interesting, has anything interesting to say.


User_Name: mtn morels
Date: Sunday June 29, 2014
Time: 10:15 AM

Messages

even morels and good wine are not recommended for everyone... now I'm seeing reputable companies offering verpas for sale. seems like they are opening themselves for litigation? As your doctor I recommend espresso and a bong hit, lol


User_Name: Lobo
Date: Sunday June 29, 2014
Time: 09:07 AM

Messages

Yes they are now predicting a return to an El Niño episode by the end of the year and perhaps by August. I will not be ready when it changes but I find it interesting to have documented patterns in past years and attempt to apply them to current weather conditions concerning fungus growth patterns. Just my feeble attempts at prognostication, yours may be more accurate.


User_Name: LivinTheLife
Date: Sunday June 29, 2014
Time: 09:02 AM

Messages

Is this thread really an attempt to "prove" to the mushroom community that licensing is needed? As a forager, you might start by learning the mushrooms before selling to chefs or the public. Just because they are a chef doesn't mean they can identify mushrooms. Can you? Really? I have seen some interesting mushrooms offered as edible. I think the Destroying Angels being marketed as matsutake by a commercial chanty picker at a community fair pretty much take the cake. The mis-identified truffles that I have seen marketed by a mushroom farmer at the Mac Granary were, luckily, not poisonous. That outfit also sells honey mushrooms, which make some people sick. Heck, even people that know better serve questionable mushrooms. One restaurateur told me that he picks and uses Ramaria rasilispora whenever he can because few actually pick them and they are still there when he gets to the field. He told me that eating at high end restaurants often causes gastric distress and the customer would have no idea that the diarrhea they experienced after eating at his restaurant was traceable to the Ramaria. I think he is just too cheap to buy real porcini! LOL!


User_Name: Keith Stone
Date: Saturday June 28, 2014
Time: 07:53 AM

Messages

This years el nino is a little different homey.


User_Name: Keith Stone
Date: Saturday June 28, 2014
Time: 07:51 AM

Messages

I know where morels are, I know where morels are. NEE NER...NEE NER....NEEEE NEEERRR !!!!!!!!!


User_Name: Lobo
Date: Friday June 27, 2014
Time: 10:06 PM

Messages

As long as I am stuck in the desert SW I shall look forward to winters of La Niña because it brings the deserts to life and a bountiful foraging paradise as did El Niño episodes when I used to follow the circuit in the NW.


User_Name: Handy J
Date: Friday June 27, 2014
Time: 08:33 PM

Messages

perhaps LA NINA will stick around? Dude.......


User_Name: Lobo
Date: Friday June 27, 2014
Time: 07:03 PM

Messages

Welcome back Daddy, wish I could be there to go foraging in your current state or our home state. Oh well at least I am making progress. I'm going to miss matsutake season this fall but I have enough dried from last year in central Oregon & Adams areas to satisfy. I didn't even get to forage any cactus morels this spring, perhaps La Niña will stick around so that we will have a bumper crop this coming winter season. Best of luck to you and the girls in foraging; I should say young ladies, as they are getting there.


User_Name: Woody
Date: Friday June 27, 2014
Time: 09:14 AM

Messages

Yeah, we don't need to have a handful of big players in control of the market, or any market in anything for that matter.


User_Name: Vern
Date: Friday June 27, 2014
Time: 08:53 AM

Messages

Back when I gathered wild mushrooms in the early 70's till the 80's there were no mushroom buyers as we know them now who worked for big distributors who controlled the market. If you knew about edible wild mushrooms you gathered them and ate them and maybe sold some to other people who appreciated them. Then a few people got the idea to go commercial in a big way and at first they were happy to have anyone harvest mushrooms and sell to them. Then came the idea it would be better if they could get immigrants and field workers who were less...shall we say....sophisticated, and easier to "manage" than the independent people who were previously the source of wild mushrooms brought to the market. Now as a result of different factors it looks like were going full circle and I am glad to see that.


User_Name: Daddy in Wa
Date: Friday June 27, 2014
Time: 08:29 AM

Messages

Daddy in Italy is once again Daddy in Wa. Can't wait to hit the hills.


User_Name: Jack Sperrow
Date: Thursday June 26, 2014
Time: 11:24 AM

Messages

I don't know about anybody else but I'm sure looking forward to eating some fresh Matsitakes !!


User_Name: Kim
Date: Thursday June 26, 2014
Time: 07:13 AM

Messages

Susan, I don't bother with craigslist. The best way we found was to go talk to the people who run the upscale foodie joints personally. They really like the interaction with the harvesters, growers, as someone pointed out already. It might surprise you how readily they will gobble up your shrooms as long as they are quality. One thing though, this works best in bigger cities, we have a delivery route and it changes or expands every season. I would also say don't bother with restaurants in small towns of rural areas, they are a little behind the curve if you know what I mean...country folk shop at walmart and do fine dining at red lobster. ;)


User_Name: wild side
Date: Thursday June 26, 2014
Time: 06:15 AM

Messages

Dreads, Susan & ... you hit the nail on the head. I cannot stress how important it is to find your own restaurants to supply. Its really quite easy to do provided you offer CLEAN product at competitive prices. (my price is ~ $20 / lb fresh mushrooms. speaking with chefs, that price is what most B.C. higher end restaurants will accept). Ignore some of the strange B.S in here and find your own local market or elsewhere and courier to them. With gas prices and co2 being spilled all over the globe, set up long term relationships. It will help pave the road. Good luck and don't give up. That just the mushrooms, we also harvest and sell botanical forest products so when we're in the forest we are taking inventory or harvesting for another market. Expand your knowledge and supply base. Just think how that mushroom in your bucket deserves a fair market value to you!


User_Name: Susan
Date: Wednesday June 25, 2014
Time: 05:26 PM

Messages

Hi, I'm just wondering and maybe someone can help me here.......How would a person go about getting customers for the mushrooms they gather? Going door to door at small niche restaurants? Passing out cards? Craigslist? These are the ones I can think of but are there other ways as well? Thanks!


User_Name: Dreads
Date: Wednesday June 25, 2014
Time: 01:45 PM

Messages

I dont think some people here understand the seasonal, local food, restaurant model either. That's where the restaurant you go to has an ever changing menu, not just the same things all year long. They make their dishes from whatever is in season during the year, and the customer eats whatever they are cooking at the time, by choosing from a more limited but far superior quality menu than a regular Red Lobster or Outback type of place. Some of the foodie joints here in Seattle don't even have a menu and it can change daily depending on what foragers, fishermen, and farmers have available. Hell, one place I go sometimes doesn't even give you a choice! they just make one or two dishes a day and that's what they serve and if you don't want that you can just have drinks at the bar or go someplace else!


User_Name: Dreads
Date: Wednesday June 25, 2014
Time: 01:34 PM

Messages

I kind of agree with Iron Mike and Handy j both. If the Canadian matsitaki season is a bust this year due to lack of rain there very well may be a better season in Or. But, I don't think that guarantees people will make any money picking them. There have been years when they were worth as little as 1.00 per pound and that's just a complete waste of your time for sure. But sometimes the price is around 10 to maybe 12 per pound from the company buyers and then it's worth it, at least to me since that means the companies want around 30 per pound and I can get around 20 from my customers. So then they are worth picking to me.


User_Name: lost in Walmart
Date: Wednesday June 25, 2014
Time: 01:26 PM

Messages

If Idaho Montana in California have Drop commercial harvesting in their states then there shouldn't no longer be selling timber products permits for firewood cutting close the forest all together to all even campers hunters fishermen. no more Christmas tree cutting collection of pine cones oh hell why don't we just closed the whole damn forest down make it illegal to camp to fish and hunt I bet there's a lot of people out there that but love to see that happen let's stop supporting the Forest service I don't do much anyway how often do you see them out there they may go out for 2 hours and the rest of their time is in the office. no more huckleberry picking no more bear grass picking sounds like that's what most people want anyway. let's get realistic here why do so many have so much against the commercial maker many of them have families to feed and many need to supplement their income enjoy the force like the rest of us I collect rocks I take photographs I haven't taken the fresh air and I enjoy the serenity of the silence in the peaceful atmosphere I'd rather talk to the animals and talk to some of the people down here in the flatlands and I ask myself why am I on the Internet. the Internet is my way of protecting my rights as an American citizen to enjoy the outdoors in the forest the oceans the desert if I buy a permit to harvest mushrooms no one should have a right to tell me I cannot enjoy what I do. at least I don't sit around bullshitting on the internet all day and wine complain about those out there making a living and complain about how many people are out there picking and I hardly see anyone yes I can't complain too when I go to Walmart and see all the people I much rather go to a small impulse store then go to Walmart why should I go to a fire burn when I can go to my backyard fire burns..... that may just be 500 to 1000 acre Burn. hell I'm just wasting my breath why should I care about what people say here most of those that would listen or out there in the for now and enjoy what they're doing and I just took the day off I do have a right to do that. sorry and if I'm just rattling here and not making any sense I'd rather be making a few dollar and I enjoy talking to the real true pictures not the weekend picker. enough said I'll spare you all I never really got to the point what I really wanted to say.


User_Name: Kim
Date: Wednesday June 25, 2014
Time: 10:29 AM

Messages

Ron - your funny! I know you aren't as clueless as you pretended to be!


User_Name: wild side
Date: Wednesday June 25, 2014
Time: 05:37 AM

Messages

Thankfully, I believe this sand box was created and intended for sharing intelligent dialogue and moving forward with mushroom culture for all people. From what I've gathered talking on the phone or meeting face to face with veteran, decent mushroom culture people, we all have other incomes to help supplement and cushion the J curving markets to aid with our passion for helping others and allowing us the opportunity to harvest the mountains and valleys. And more importantly teach our children well. Stay cool folks and offer positive encouragement.


User_Name: PropagandaSpace
Date: Tuesday June 24, 2014
Time: 10:49 PM

Messages

Wow! This site is full of real people and people that want to steal our culture. You guys are nothing compared to The Discovery Channel. This may get very interesting. They say bring your guns to work.


User_Name: Shantyman
Date: Tuesday June 24, 2014
Time: 07:38 PM

Messages

Shantyman wanting to get in on morels in N BC. Will trade 30 yrs Pine exp for a hospitable picking "orientation" experience with an equal morel picker who wants in on Pines in N BC "ZOO" this fall. Ready to go this friday. Please leave message or text to 250 842 8545. " You have not because you ask not"


User_Name: 112451
Date: Tuesday June 24, 2014
Time: 06:34 PM

Messages

Spring Kings are at 7-8,000 ft. If you know where........


User_Name: Ron
Date: Monday June 23, 2014
Time: 07:34 PM

Messages

Oh I get it! Some restaurant dudes buy the lamb from the farmer who raises them, the apples and veggies from the farmer who grows them and the mushrooms and berries from the chicks who forage for them, when they aren't tending bar or whatever. Hey I think I've seen this stuff on foodnetwork and Anthony bourdain and all the other cooking shows! Lol!!..... I lol'd just cuz.


User_Name: Kim
Date: Monday June 23, 2014
Time: 06:31 PM

Messages

I would add it's not just part of the farm to table and foraged to table movement. it's also part of the "buy local food" movement.


User_Name: Kim
Date: Monday June 23, 2014
Time: 06:27 PM

Messages

It was nice to see somebody take their time to explain, for those who don't understand, the independent mushroom harvester movement. It's like the difference between people who shop at Walmart and those who shop at Whole foods.


User_Name: Vern
Date: Monday June 23, 2014
Time: 03:22 PM

Messages

Hey SPECTER, You bet it shrinks it down and a lot too. In fact it looks like California is following the lead of Idaho and Montana. I never hope for forest fires so we can harvest morels the next yr. They do happen though. But with it looking like only Oregon and Washington available for commercial harvest after a fire it's a very fragile situation, if your in the business of buying and selling the fire morels that is. When it comes to FARM TO TABLE, The independent harvesters already know all about the issues they mentioned. It's the big companies and their field buyers who know nothing outside of what they do and all they would have to do to find out what's going on in the outside world is ask some of the pickers who sell them mushrooms how many non-Mexican or non-Asian crews they see when they're out. But I don't think it's ever occurred to them to do that. Over the years they came to believe they were the market and they were the business and this other thing has kind of sneaked up on them while they wern't looking or paying any attention and they don't have a clue it's even there. But it is and accounts for a bigger share of the market every year. People think its cool to get a permit and get their own mushrooms and their own customers for them and the consumer really appreciates it too!


User_Name: roxanne
Date: Monday June 23, 2014
Time: 12:57 PM

Messages

were can we go to pick morals near red deer or just in alberta


User_Name: knowspicker
Date: Monday June 23, 2014
Time: 12:54 PM

Messages

thank you "Farm to table" guy (or gal) for your comment. I'm a big fan of that business model and will be soliciting the local farmers markets but I also feel that as long as the buyer respects the fact that it's the picker that is making it possible for them to be in business, and they treat us fairly, then they deserve to make some money for the convenience they provide.


User_Name: knowspicker
Date: Monday June 23, 2014
Time: 12:26 PM

Messages

hey ksmorelhunter, that burn pretty much dried up about a week ago. I'm hoping to get about $150/pound for the ones I managed to get. The picking was great 'til everyone else showed up.


User_Name: Farm To Table
Date: Monday June 23, 2014
Time: 12:04 PM

Messages

I've followed some of the recent conversation here regarding selling ones mushrooms they have harvested themselves to a field buyer who works for a company, or selling them yourself, directly, to a private buyer. Here are some facts for those who may not have heard of the "Farm To Table" movement: This is a trend that has been around for the last two decades or so, that has grown enormously over the years and is now a huge movement. Basically, what it is, is people who like the best quality ingredients in their food for various reasons including taste, freshness, no pesticides, no hormones or antibiotics, humanely and ethically harvested etc.. get together and trade or do business. A farmer who raises free range sheep or chickens on natural feed without antibiotics sells to restaurants who caters to a clientele that favors and appreciates the quality of the product and supports this "small business" model rather than the factory farm "big box" model. The berry/fruit farmer who uses no pesticides has a similar model he works from. Weather these food products find the end consumer through a farmers market, restaurant, or direct purchase, the point is there is a demand and somebody is providing the products for that demand. I don't see why this isn't better understood. When a mushroom harvester sells what he/she has harvested in a similar fashion as I've described above, he is participating in the farm to table or, in his/her case, the "Foraged To Table" movement. Weather farm to table, or foraged to table, it's the same movement. The people who grow, raise or harvest the foods they sell are in direct contact and work in harmony with their customers. There in no middleman, wholesaler, distributor, etc.. What I have described above regarding the movement does NOT fit the model used by big mushroom distributors who employ field buyers and make use of what some have called slave-wage workers. With the coming of the internet many business models have been affected, some completely done away with, think of the old bookstore model. See? The farm to table and foraged to table people would never accept the model used by the big mushroom companies and for various and important reasons. So what we're really talking about here is two separate and different business entirely. On supplies one market and that demand while the other supplies another market and that demand. I hope this helps for those who don't seem to understand why the independent harvesters reject the "big box" mushroom model.


User_Name: wild side
Date: Monday June 23, 2014
Time: 11:45 AM

Messages

fellow harvestors, Scope is Re: Northern Morels Buying Stations: before loading up and heading out there, learn to weed out the unnecessary info. and search for valuable info. as mentioned in previous posts, pls send pics : general landscape, buying stations and prices. no real goodies being given away there (with today's technology that should be rather easy with cameras on cell phones nearly everywhere). I'm surprised more buying stations are not doing this along with dates. most wise harvestors would not post pertinent info., especially if the going's good. best to keep your patches to yourself, professional harvestors usually find their own and rarely share. always remember to have fun, ... peace y'all


User_Name: Shamrocky
Date: Monday June 23, 2014
Time: 10:34 AM

Messages

I got a killer patch going at 12,000 ft right now. Were pulling in hundreds of pounds every couple days and sending them down to the summit on pack Llamas. Get your mountaineering gear together, hire a Sherpa, and get on it, the seasons ending soon don't sleep in. But in all seriousness I see a good late season happening possibly in some places and that's where I'm planning to be. May lots of greys graces your buckets... but stay outta my ice-capped mountain patch!


User_Name: Ron
Date: Monday June 23, 2014
Time: 08:30 AM

Messages

Hey peeps, I'm checking to see if my new tablet works for this campground! We're on an extended vacation, while also researching some areas. I'm not so sure sharing important information with the world is a good idea. Often information has value, but only as long as the whole world doesn't know it. I don't know why some people think it's neat. Or maybe they just don't understand what they're doing. I would never tell anybody where or how much mushrooms I'm finding. Ever.


User_Name: wild side
Date: Monday June 23, 2014
Time: 07:45 AM

Messages

fellow harvestors , ... careful of heresay this and heresay that. anyone sending pictures adds great credibility along with contact names and numbers. ... send some pictures of what's going on. all the best out there!


User_Name: Ksmorelhunter
Date: Sunday June 22, 2014
Time: 09:14 PM

Messages

Know picker, how much are you asking per pound? Are you still having good luck hunting in that burn? Thanks!


User_Name: Specter
Date: Sunday June 22, 2014
Time: 08:38 PM

Messages

I meant just lurked here


User_Name: Specter
Date: Sunday June 22, 2014
Time: 08:37 PM

Messages

Never posted here before just jurked but I was reading where Idaho and Montana don't allow commercial picking anymore. Doesn't that kind of narrow down the available areas? For fire morels I mean.


User_Name: knowspicker
Date: Sunday June 22, 2014
Time: 08:03 PM

Messages

I have about 25 lbs of dried morels here from the colockum-tarps burn that I'd like to sell. Can anyone out there help me out?


User_Name: Kim
Date: Sunday June 22, 2014
Time: 03:41 PM

Messages

Oh I forgot to mention! When we were harvesting Morels near Sisters this spring we met a small group of college people who said they sold to a buyer in Eugene for 16.00 a pound. They said the persons name but I cant remember it. Does anybody know a buyer located there? If not they are probably one of the new independent buyers then.


User_Name: Handy J
Date: Sunday June 22, 2014
Time: 12:53 PM

Messages

iron mike your awful optimistic aren't you? whenever there is a big harvest of pine mushrooms in chemult the price drops to a buck or two a pound regardless of whats happening in Canada or anywhere else. the buyers have a captive audience once the pickers show up they think they'll make them pick for nothing. I have wondered if it isn't a fun game for them, seeing how little they can pay the people who provide them with their living, without whom they wouldn't even be in the mushroom business. Disgusting. I refuse to play somebody elses game like that.


User_Name: alex83
Date: Sunday June 22, 2014
Time: 12:25 PM

Messages

Hi all I have fresh and dry BOLETE any one know where i can sell them ? Thank you all


User_Name: Woody
Date: Sunday June 22, 2014
Time: 10:29 AM

Messages

Yeah that would be great for those of us who are trying to maintain some kind of contact with what's currently going on in the mushroom world. All we know is what companies and buyers tell us, which may or may not be factual at all. Especially us ol farts!


User_Name: wild side
Date: Sunday June 22, 2014
Time: 09:44 AM

Messages

Hey, anybody up north picking morels, can you send some pictures of what's going on. ... landscape, buying stations, price signs, pics like that would be awesome as they tell a thousand words. Happy trails.


User_Name: Jan
Date: Sunday June 22, 2014
Time: 05:53 AM

Messages

With too many pickers and dry weather the situation in Carmacs changed quickly.Every day you have to walk more and more to get some morels.Lot of pickers left already and some of them are moving to big fire in Great slave lake,NWT area.Only good news is some buyers now pay 11 CAD.If nothing change it looks ,that in one week , the season can be over


User_Name: Ksmorelhunter
Date: Saturday June 21, 2014
Time: 09:36 PM

Messages

Jan, congrats on the story and your success in Carmacks. Do you have an email address or phone number where you can be reached as I am thinking of heading to the rea and was hoping I could chat with you first. Thanks


User_Name: 112451
Date: Saturday June 21, 2014
Time: 01:40 PM

Messages

So nobody wants to pick chanterelles for 2.00 a pound? Oh c'mon don't be like THAT!!


User_Name: Iron Mike
Date: Friday June 20, 2014
Time: 01:58 PM

Messages

But ya I need like 25 a pound minimum for my time otherwise I'm out.


User_Name: Iron Mike
Date: Friday June 20, 2014
Time: 01:56 PM

Messages

Oh Come on Kim don't be like that! Just think of how fun it is working all day outside in the fresh air.....for no money! HA HA! I am actually very interested in the long term weather....If Canada/Wa has a greatly diminished matsi season or, no harvest at all because of El Nino.....And that does happen and those who have been around a while have seen that before, it might be a game changer. We can all go invade Chemult or Southern Or!


User_Name: hunnerd#aday
Date: Friday June 20, 2014
Time: 01:12 PM

Messages

Who's paying top-dollar in Carmacks? $14, fack, I thought it was 10 across the board.


User_Name: Woody
Date: Friday June 20, 2014
Time: 09:50 AM

Messages

Hey mad morel, ha yer funny with the "non believers" thing. I just don't think you can expect one person in mushrooms to be world wide famous. Lots of people are sort of kinda sorta famous in their own circles..


User_Name: Kim
Date: Friday June 20, 2014
Time: 07:42 AM

Messages

I have other things to do with my time and for my income rather than grub around in the rain trying to make 30 or 40 dollars. Ya the farm workers can have the matsutaki's. Unless they are worth like maybe 25.00 per pound other wise forget it.


User_Name: visioncreation
Date: Friday June 20, 2014
Time: 03:30 AM

Messages

Well, capitalism is alive and well I see, come to the yukon and make thousands.... see only one fire is producing.... but you just get here and we will look after you.... 14 $ per lb.... 12 $ 10$ pick 200-300 lbs per day...... ha ha haa joke is on you pick your heart out anhd we will give you enough for gas money home..... Ah ha ha haaa


User_Name: visioncreation
Date: Friday June 20, 2014
Time: 03:18 AM

Messages

Yep Keith stone, I have to agree. It could be a time to send smoke signals to the gods in hope of better prices. We cannot continue to ``support the man, if all else fails we can at least eat them. A wise old lady once told me when I was trying to sell dried morels....`son, if you are gonna sell those premium mushrooms for that (250 per lb) what the hell are you gonna buy with that money.... a cheap cut of meat like weiners....! Yep she is right, cheers to Yvonne Osiguy. 80 years old, still on the farm by herself and still teaching 55 year old shit heads like me! My second mom Yvonne!


User_Name: Daddy Mac
Date: Thursday June 19, 2014
Time: 09:30 PM

Messages

Matsi's are worth the same as yellow chanty. 4-6 bucks. NOT worth the trouble. The got the field workers for that crap.


User_Name: Keith Stone
Date: Thursday June 19, 2014
Time: 05:42 PM

Messages

Wow that national weather service forecast looks bad for the fall Canada areas. The big brown spot of driest on the maps is dead center on upper Washington and Vancouver BC. But hey if there is no matsi season there maybe will be finally be worth more than chanterelles this years,for a change, and therefore worth picking! Think positive everyone!


User_Name: Mister Morel
Date: Thursday June 19, 2014
Time: 02:15 PM

Messages

The only newbie here is you and if that newbie bs is intended as an insult or put down your way off, it doesn't work. Grow up. Better still stop following somebody else - you admire?- around like a puppy singing their praises at every opportunity. I'd venture most people in the mushroom world have never hear of this person and couldn't care less about your hero or whatever.


User_Name: King of Shrooms... lol
Date: Thursday June 19, 2014
Time: 01:08 PM

Messages

Randy Marchand has certainly earned his name as King Morel and usually does not rise up to the bait put out by newbees who have little moral fortitude. His knowledge is legendary on this board and elsewhere; perhaps the detractor is in bed with Chris Matherly who stole photos and writings for his book chapter on fire morels or may be just a newby that hasn’t been around long enough to know better. Randy has been-thar-dun-that on gourmet mushrooms from Alaska to his home in Ontario and down to South America and all places between. It would be next to impossible for anyone to match the Kings experience or knowledge. All you are showing is ignorance.


User_Name: Mister Morel
Date: Thursday June 19, 2014
Time: 12:31 PM

Messages

Yeah what he said omg.


User_Name: Daddy Mac
Date: Thursday June 19, 2014
Time: 09:55 AM

Messages

Ha ha ha! Mad Morel, I have no idea who that guy is but anybody who goes around calling himself kingmorel is probably....well...um...


User_Name: Mo Munny
Date: Thursday June 19, 2014
Time: 09:35 AM

Messages

It's already DRY as hell most places in the burns and anybody who thinks the permafrost will save our season is a moron


User_Name: Vern
Date: Thursday June 19, 2014
Time: 07:56 AM

Messages

Well the national weather service report is out today and like the last couple reports there is a little something for everyone. El Nino is coming into effect for sure but how that plays out exactly, we'll just have to wait and see.


User_Name: Boletus Joe
Date: Wednesday June 18, 2014
Time: 10:14 PM

Messages

Not there, Wish I was.... But now that the price is starting to go up.... Tells me they are going over the top. and when the quality goes down ...and it will. Then the price will go in half.... And everyone will start dryin' (and cryin')...... Till the "grey's" start. Can't wait to see some of the post here when that happens...... Should be some interesting reading..... Be safe people...


User_Name: rover
Date: Wednesday June 18, 2014
Time: 08:08 PM

Messages

10 bucks in the Yukon only one fire producing so lots of people there and lots of. Buyers.king morel hasn't picked just working for a company Drying so of course he wants pickers to come


User_Name: Mad morel
Date: Wednesday June 18, 2014
Time: 07:23 PM

Messages

To those non believers that would not listen too many of the old timers that have more knowledge than the Internet when it comes to mushrooms. step back into March 22nd at 9:58 pm and reread what Randy said King Morel. Morel pickers wanted. in the Yukon and this will be the year we set Records. by the way prices are from $12.to $16. A lb. It's like an ocean swaying back and forth. Tata


User_Name: Spinner Chicks
Date: Wednesday June 18, 2014
Time: 08:45 AM

Messages

Hey dudes! We found a bucket and a half, almost 30 lbs, of fresh, tight, worm free buttons on that last trip. It was a full days work what with the hike in. I think they are coming to an end tho as we found them all in just two patches. As independent harvesters we don't sell to a company buyer so we can get any mushrooms we gather to our customers by the next day, but we're keeping and eating these fresh and dried! The recipes for spring kings are around the internets right now, Hank Shaw and Langdon Cook have both posted what look to be delicious ones to their blogs. Have a great summer everyone! We'll see what the fall, (or maybe even late summer) rains bring us! xoxoxo


User_Name: beeg pimp buyer
Date: Wednesday June 18, 2014
Time: 08:13 AM

Messages

Come to the carmacs, we are getting stinking rich! 300 lbs/day!


User_Name: Handy J
Date: Tuesday June 17, 2014
Time: 08:17 PM

Messages

Arf arf!! arf arf !! Bragging again? What a maroon!


User_Name: Jan
Date: Tuesday June 17, 2014
Time: 06:12 PM

Messages

Everybody,who is not making 300 CAD per day in Carmacs is lazy,blind or trust fund baby without motivation.Most of the serious pickers,which I am talking to are actualy making much more then me.I dont know if this is true but Boomer(buyer) told me,he was here first before eveybody else and he was picking for 8 days and every day he got at least 200 lb ...


User_Name: Ron
Date: Tuesday June 17, 2014
Time: 05:29 PM

Messages

Woody, I don't think that's a problem there much. Canada is a very progressive country. At least among young people. Nobody goes to jail for weed there anymore and Ho's are pretty much accepted as well, as long as they are adults who aren't being exploited.


User_Name: Woody
Date: Tuesday June 17, 2014
Time: 04:47 PM

Messages

Hears what I know about boom towns weather it's mining a hundred years ago or carmacks right now.....Wherever young men, or women for that matter go when there's a boom, there always those who want to set up shop "mining the miners." Sell food, shovels, weed, whatever. With mushroom booms that means booze, ho's, and gambling, and weed for sure, in no particular order. I wish the morality police the best in "stamping out" this menace to the peace and dignity of their little town. LOL!!!!!!!!


User_Name: Nick
Date: Tuesday June 17, 2014
Time: 04:35 PM

Messages

I am looking for a buyer in louisiana. Can anyone lead me in the right direction. I have chanterelles.


User_Name: Handy J
Date: Tuesday June 17, 2014
Time: 04:27 PM

Messages

See what I Said yeaterday, and it only took one hr. Lol.


User_Name: Handy J
Date: Tuesday June 17, 2014
Time: 04:26 PM

Messages

Mad morel, I've never heard of this person you speak so highly of. Are you up there picking now? How much are you making a day?


User_Name: Mad morel
Date: Tuesday June 17, 2014
Time: 03:20 PM

Messages

No no I did not misspell auto correction did it for me no way to go back and correct


User_Name: Mad morel
Date: Tuesday June 17, 2014
Time: 03:17 PM

Messages

Randy M (Kingmorel) is the man that knows what he's talking about. they're setting the prices of in the Yukon and they're up to their asses and elbows in Morels. nothing but a sea of morels. salir put him down earlier this spring when ask for some people to go north with him as there guide. so many put him down just because of some others in the past nobody knows him as well as I and a few others, what he said is true and some of you or just bulls loudmouth that just want to hear their mouths rattle.


User_Name: Fishgod
Date: Tuesday June 17, 2014
Time: 02:36 PM

Messages

Found some beautiful prince mushrooms in bark mulch at the complex where I live.


User_Name: Mo Munny
Date: Tuesday June 17, 2014
Time: 09:16 AM

Messages

I don't believe any of you people nobody is stupid enough to talk about how much they are making and exaggerate it for a camera. I've not seen anyone make more than 200 or so.


User_Name: Daddy Mac
Date: Tuesday June 17, 2014
Time: 08:55 AM

Messages

I hate to brag too, but am making 600 a day minimum with no sweat! It's just unreal the morels are everywhere and they are literly jumping in my buckets! I'm getting 15 a pound so you other guys are selling too cheap!


User_Name: Martin
Date: Tuesday June 17, 2014
Time: 08:29 AM

Messages

Oh my yes it's just amazinf everybody makes at least 4-5 hundred a day easy and that's not even a whole day. No telling what we would make if we worked all day.


User_Name: shroombuddy
Date: Tuesday June 17, 2014
Time: 06:15 AM

Messages

Hi Jan, you were great on the report from CBC. I heard it on the radio this morning. yes, the cat is most definitely out of the bag about Carmacks. the bag is shredded and thrown away. A friend of mine just came back to Vancouver this week, after being up there for two weeks, and says he's never seen a burn like it. Cream picking, compared to some years. sorry oops. it's not a secret. and if you can't make it, what's the harm in letting others know, specially when thousands know already? it's a one-year crop, not a perennial crop like pines, which I won't share with others. Full buckets to everyone heading out this spring and summer. and let's pray for another unreal autumn like last year. :)


User_Name: GRANT
Date: Monday June 16, 2014
Time: 09:26 PM

Messages

Any calfbrains in the Blue Mts. this year?


User_Name: Dave roth
Date: Monday June 16, 2014
Time: 08:41 PM

Messages

Not to brag or anything but I am making 6-7 hundred a day minimum! Then I wake up!


User_Name: OOOOOOPPPPssss
Date: Monday June 16, 2014
Time: 08:06 PM

Messages

Big OoooPs.... Now you really spilled the beans.... Not another word PLEASE!!


User_Name: Jan
Date: Monday June 16, 2014
Time: 06:38 PM

Messages

I think,that I am an average picker and I am getting in Carmacs 35 - 40 pounds every day(10 CAD/lb) in 6 - 7 hours.You just need to know where to go.Here is a link to CBC news report about Carmacs mushroom rush from last week(me included) - http://www.cbc.ca/player/News/Canada/North/ID/2464486462/


User_Name: Handy J
Date: Monday June 16, 2014
Time: 05:35 PM

Messages

Just wait a few, somebody will claim they're getting like 10 buckets per person and making 500 dollars a day,. Lol....


User_Name: Ron
Date: Monday June 16, 2014
Time: 12:22 PM

Messages

150.00 a day is pretty good but it isn't big money. It's roughly like 10 or 12 bucks an hr. Especially if you factor in most days mushrooming for pro's starts at dawn and isn't over till after dark - no 9 to 5ers get the kind of money they should be getting. I'm not badmouthing it though I think it's great, the whole experience! I pick mushrooms too believe it or not, just cuz I like doing it. I wonder what this will do for or to the going market price of No 1 dried Morels?............If it drops too low it could even go below my break even point, yikes!. But when I buy mushrooms I assume the risk, just like any other investment. I pay right for them to the people who do the lions share of the work, the harvesters, and I assume the risk from there. It's the only ethical way. Some buyers on the other hand will screw the pickers anytime and any way they can trying to transfer the risk to them. That's not my thing!


User_Name: 112451
Date: Monday June 16, 2014
Time: 10:38 AM

Messages

I heard about the canada morels but I couldn't get away to go but it sure sounds like fun and maybe even make some money too. Plus there's Canadian Chicks there so......ya there's that..Hey I bet theres no Mexicans up there at least not the illegal ones since they can cant get across the border anymore. The human wave of pickers are Canadians and the few who traveled up there from down here.


User_Name: Vern
Date: Monday June 16, 2014
Time: 08:46 AM

Messages

Beer at 8 am? Oooh that's harcore! You could hang with me or my people anytime!


User_Name: madmorel
Date: Monday June 16, 2014
Time: 08:36 AM

Messages

Questions questions questions, Hey Joe did you get my email I hope it helps you out. quality it's sometimes hard to come by with the pickers nowadays they don't care what they have they just make the buyer work harder. I like to get into a bind station get out mine are graded and ready to go way me and pay me goodnight I'm going for a beer


User_Name: Vern
Date: Monday June 16, 2014
Time: 08:35 AM

Messages

Well the Yukon Morel harvest has been underway now for a couple weeks and it looks good, volume wise. Carmacks area is the best producing I'm told. Supposedly it's not a super awesome harvest but enough to make a little money. Number one Son went up there with a small group of friends after the season here petered out in late may and they report 150 dollar days for the average harvester. No big money, but not bad either! He say it's drying out now so who knows how much longer it will last. Remember people when it comes to mushrooms - You have to strike while the iron is hot!


User_Name: jd
Date: Sunday June 15, 2014
Time: 01:35 PM

Messages

Well said Shroomkid


User_Name: 112451
Date: Sunday June 15, 2014
Time: 11:18 AM

Messages

Another thing weather your and selling yourself or selling to a buyer is years like last year when Chanterells were in a massive bumper crop everywhere and you couldn't make any money picking them so you just stay out. Don't bother picking them at all except to eat because there's no money in it. I guess that can apply to other mushrooms too. You do whatever else it is you do for your income besides mushrooms. Unless you like working for nothing that is. A good spring season makes you money and if the following fall is bad your average income from mushrooms drops off big. Stay out and don't waste your time when there's no money in it is my style.


User_Name: shroomkid
Date: Sunday June 15, 2014
Time: 10:57 AM

Messages

Hi Kim, they bring in other non-timber forest products, and market them. Or, they have regular jobs for a little while. or they are semi-retired, and travel, or head back to their homes and garden away the summer till fall. and, of course, work during the off-season to bolster their customer base. ... and contemplate life! take care.


User_Name: Woody
Date: Sunday June 15, 2014
Time: 08:57 AM

Messages

One thing nobody mentions is the quality of wild harvested mushrooms that get to the consumer. Many commercial harvesters who sell to field buyers mis-handle and damage the mushrooms because they are unskilled or unconcerned about condition or both, mainly interested in how many pounds they can get, not so much in quality because they know the field buyer will paw through them and pick out the ones he doesn't like when they go sell. So that's step one. Step two is, if you sell to a field buyer, they go through them pawing and handling them, some cant seem to help but actually play with them, bruising and damaging the quality further. This shortens the shelf life and degrades the product that gets to the consumers table weather it's a restaurant or someone's home kitchen. And there is no way around this process. Also, field buyers often hold the mushrooms for 2-3 days or more, before delivering them to the company. Once the mushrooms arrive there they are further handled, pawed and played with damaging the quality further. Then they sit in a cooler until they are shipped. You see what I'm getting at here? When the people I know harvest wild mushrooms they do it right. They are independent workers free of the system I described above, and see themselves as responsible, quality and pride in your work oriented people.They put only the good quality edible mushrooms in the bucket in the first place and once in the bucket they are not handled or played with again until the bucket is emptied and the mushrooms put into baskets and weighed and delivered to the end consumer, who gets a much better quality product as a result.


User_Name: keith stone
Date: Sunday June 15, 2014
Time: 07:38 AM

Messages

Yeah theyre still around, just dropped by to see whats up around here am on my way out the door after more morels. This year the big companies were charging 35-40 bucks a pound plus shipping! That's easy to undercut and I do it all season long. My customers get fresher better quality and pay considerably less for them. Plus I deliver if that's what they want! You see why it's better doing it this way for sure.


User_Name: Spinner Chicks
Date: Sunday June 15, 2014
Time: 07:25 AM

Messages

Hey dudes! We are heading out today for a run at some more spring kings after a friend of ours keeps coming back with buckets full of them. I know, we thought we were done too, guess not!


User_Name: Boletus Joe
Date: Saturday June 14, 2014
Time: 10:28 PM

Messages

Jees!!!! Just had a great idea.... I should start a mushroom marketing school.....LOL


User_Name: Boletus Joe
Date: Saturday June 14, 2014
Time: 10:25 PM

Messages

Joel_Bolete.... what is with all the questions? I'll say this once.... What do you get for them if you sell to a buyer? That's the second step, so what does the buyer get? and when it gets to the main buyer (third step) what does he get? and that is where the biggest mark up is. (Are you getting this?) So now go and ask a ridiculous price, and if you get it well great. And if you don't then drop it a bit... perhaps a course in economics might be in order...... But above all don't sell at such a low price that you shoot yourself in the foot..... Like so many do. Once you have set that price You have set the bar..... Then you make sure that you give GOOD, CLEAN, WORM FREE product. and above all don't make promises you can't keep. Hope this helps.... don't do it for GREED.....


User_Name: Dreads
Date: Saturday June 14, 2014
Time: 09:20 PM

Messages

The mushroom industry you know may be on the decline but the mushroom industry I know is on the upswing bigtime.


User_Name: Dreads
Date: Saturday June 14, 2014
Time: 09:16 PM

Messages

I don't buy mushrooms but I do pick and eat them and sometimes I sell em! If you look back over the last several years or longer the erratic weather hasn't provided for any more than 2-3 months in the spring and the same in the fall at the very most for any fieled buyers.


User_Name: jd
Date: Saturday June 14, 2014
Time: 09:05 PM

Messages

Soon the Forest Service will not allow s to pick. Most of Idaho, and Montana are closed to commercial picking.


User_Name: jd
Date: Saturday June 14, 2014
Time: 08:59 PM

Messages

Also arguing the fact with a picker that their natural morels are wormy not fresh market.


User_Name: JD
Date: Saturday June 14, 2014
Time: 08:57 PM

Messages

What do mushroom buyers do 8 or 9 months? It would be fair to say the average buyer works at least 8 months out of the year. Between traveling to different areas and scouting takes a lot of time. Getting the fairest price for the foragers and putting up with attitudes when your trying to help everyone. The mushroom industry is on the decline.


User_Name: Kim
Date: Saturday June 14, 2014
Time: 08:35 PM

Messages

Any other buyers wanna share what it is they do when they're not buying mushrooms?


User_Name: Joel_Bolete
Date: Saturday June 14, 2014
Time: 08:13 PM

Messages

I'm going out for oysters tomorrow. Whats the average rate for private sale per lb. in Western BC?


User_Name: Ben Bizzy
Date: Saturday June 14, 2014
Time: 04:10 PM

Messages

I wasn't talking about you Woody. It's obvious Vern knows whats going on in the outside world too.


User_Name: Woody
Date: Saturday June 14, 2014
Time: 08:46 AM

Messages

Ha Ha real funny to group everybody together as old and know nothing. lol. I've been around a long time and I know exactly what's up in the here and now. You guys who are out of the old system are right on and are the future. The amount of morels that companies get now is a smaller part of the total harvest with each passing year and that's good for everybody. Harvesters and consumers alike. Not so good for the bigger companies though...


User_Name: Ben Bizzy
Date: Saturday June 14, 2014
Time: 06:47 AM

Messages

Ron is the man! He buys all our morels and has been the no 1 guy for us for years. If your old or aint been around in a while you really have no idea whats going on these days


User_Name: Ron
Date: Friday June 13, 2014
Time: 08:46 PM

Messages

Ya uh some of what I read here form the old codgers is pretty funny too. So I guess it all rounds out then huh?


User_Name: Ron,
Date: Friday June 13, 2014
Time: 08:43 PM

Messages

And since it's 8 something Friday nite and I'm on like my 6th glass of wine my typing is a little off.


User_Name: Ron
Date: Friday June 13, 2014
Time: 08:41 PM

Messages

Ok Kim I'll tell you. I am a small businessman and have various long trem investment that yield a yearly return. I started doing the mushrooms about 20 years ago after my father died and the trust fund started. I'm thinking of quitting mushroom buying though and moving to Colorado to get into business there, that's more lucrative then mushrooms, use you imagination ;)


User_Name: oldtimeer
Date: Friday June 13, 2014
Time: 08:14 PM

Messages

Some of what I read here from many new people I can't help but laugh at. long time on this board but you guys are funny no everything


User_Name: visioncreation
Date: Friday June 13, 2014
Time: 06:49 PM

Messages

Buyers make enough during the few months of 'work' to sit pretty the rest of the year!


User_Name: Kim
Date: Friday June 13, 2014
Time: 02:02 PM

Messages

I got to wondering about something as a result of the recent discussion - What do field buyers do for a living the 8 or 9 or 10 months out of the year when their not out buying mushrooms? They have to live just like everybody else. Are there any buyers willing to share with us what exactly it is that they do for a living?


User_Name: Woody
Date: Friday June 13, 2014
Time: 01:21 PM

Messages

Hey man, after 50 plus years living here and making all kinds of friends over the years, young and old, including many into mushrooms, I pretty much know whats going on with mushrooms anywhere anytime. There are still morels around. Just not in what you'd call commercial quantity. Maybe Idaho Or Montana there is but trying to sneak around and get them like that is a bad idea, what with the law and all. Who want to go to jail for a pail of mushrooms?


User_Name: Handy J
Date: Friday June 13, 2014
Time: 10:17 AM

Messages

The season for morels is short and this year it was cut about in half by the weather. If people want to buy morels they need to get on it while it's happening not wait till it's over or almost over.


User_Name: camairmushrooms
Date: Friday June 13, 2014
Time: 05:50 AM

Messages

We are suppliers of all varieties of mushrooms,both in large and small quantities,anyone out there interested,should feel free to contact us directly at camairmushrooms@gmail.com thanks.


User_Name: Mad morel
Date: Thursday June 12, 2014
Time: 05:31 PM

Messages

I fill that the weather here in the northwest cant and well do what it won'ts to do with out el nino


User_Name: Vern
Date: Thursday June 12, 2014
Time: 05:19 PM

Messages

Mike I think what your doing putting the word out there is an excellent idea and a good way to buy directly from the harvesters. I'm just not sure at the point, due mainly to the dry conditions across Wa as well as Or if there is much quantity of morels left to get. I hope you can get whats available though


User_Name: Mike
Date: Thursday June 12, 2014
Time: 01:18 PM

Messages

If anyone in WA has morels they would like to sell to a smaller, private buyer, speak up. You get paid a fair price, and we're easy to work with. We are located in the Puget Sound area but make weekly runs to central/eastern Washington. Most of our morels come from pickers who live out that way, but if you live in the Puget Sound area too, then even better. Bring your haul back home and contact us, no need to locate a buying station along the way back. Happy trails - Mike (I don't want to post my phone number publicly so if you're interested include an email address and I will send contact info to there).


User_Name: Dreads
Date: Thursday June 12, 2014
Time: 10:31 AM

Messages

Hang in there lil buckaroo, there will be lobster mushrooms and chanty's pretty soon because we're switching to an el nino weather pattern and that will lower all the moisture that's been getting dumped up north right down in Or. and Northern Ca. I've seen it before and actually it happens all the time. Of course that wont make a for a good fall season in Canada maybe not even northern Wa either but who cares as long as we're rockin it down here!.


User_Name: Jonnytutu
Date: Wednesday June 11, 2014
Time: 11:47 PM

Messages

Hi folks, just wondering if anyone knows of a buyer in the west kootenay area...


User_Name: Mad morel
Date: Wednesday June 11, 2014
Time: 06:23 PM

Messages

Okay so much for this auto correction notify your state representative on your four service is not doing their job and most of the Mexican pickers are probably illegal in the first place


User_Name: Mad morel
Date: Wednesday June 11, 2014
Time: 06:11 PM

Messages

kyle, you have all the rights to speak out on what you see firsthand and I've seen it here in washington state is well. If my post offend you I apologize. We need to control this littering by finding the offenders and reporting them to the Forest Service or your local sheriff's .department and if the sheriff's department and for service does not do anything about it


User_Name: Handy J
Date: Wednesday June 11, 2014
Time: 06:08 PM

Messages

I got my own customers for the mushrooms I pick. I dont need a buyer from some company for anything. The forest service better not be setting any kind of policy to suit the best interests of any mushroom companies. They are supposed to be the stewards of land that belong to the American people, not any businesses.


User_Name: Sam I Am
Date: Wednesday June 11, 2014
Time: 03:54 PM

Messages

Well It looks like everyone is back from the woods and posting comments here again. I struck out on my own, really for the first time this year and did ok on morels. My mentors, a small group of pro's wouldn't let me hang with them they said I need to stick around home with wifey and kids. I guess they are right but I felt tied down nonetheless. But I had fun by myself and did pretty good on a few weekend hunts. Hey what other people have said about Jack Creek mushroom camp is true. I went up there mid may and it was gawd awful. Okies and bums alright and one of those half wit rednecks buying mushrooms offered me 10.00 for my grade A morels when I asked how much he was paying. I wasn't going to sell to anybody there I just wanted to know how much they were paying! Ya that was a really gloomy place like a homeless camp almost and now that I've seen it I have no desire to ever go there again. My professional buddies were right in telling me never deal with those buyers find a market for yourself and get rid of the predatory middleman.


User_Name: Spinner Chicks
Date: Wednesday June 11, 2014
Time: 07:56 AM

Messages

Sup peoples! Hey we got some really nice morels in may and dried them all and we we're finding phat spring kings up until a week or so ago and one customer bought all we could get so that was really cool. Our friend is finding lots of them up high still but he's hardcore and packs way in like nobody ever so we cant do that. I guess we're done now but it sure was fun and because we are indie and never sell to buyers just our own customers we actually made money so that was cool too! Here's to looking foreward to a good fall harvest. After burning man of course! XOXOXO


User_Name: Kyle Reese
Date: Wednesday June 11, 2014
Time: 06:33 AM

Messages

I saw for myself how much trash the mushrooms people left in the burns down in Southern Oregon this spring. Juice cans and beer bottles is right. Hey man when you see cans in Spanish you can pretty well figure they came from a Mexican foods store and were drank by Mexicans. I'm not bashing all of them but some sure do fit what Vern described. Your spun if you think everybody litters too. This is Oregon and I've lived here my whole life and not only does everybody not litter but only a tiny percentage do. Why do I get the feeling that some of the long time posters on these comments boards go out of their way to make excuses for and defend the perps and guilty parties?


User_Name: Mad morel
Date: Wednesday June 11, 2014
Time: 01:50 AM

Messages

Trash has been around in the forest for a long time not just from the mushroom hunter the Mexicans are the Asians but from fishermen campers hunter weekenders dirt bikers puddle jumpers anybody who goes into the forest does it and I don't. agree with it don't put it all on the picker


User_Name: Lucky
Date: Wednesday June 11, 2014
Time: 01:02 AM

Messages

Why bash the buyers? The problems are systemic to unregulated capitalism. There are no jobs because banks have tightened lending and the corporations have moved production to less regulated areas. The result: There are four more new recruits behind you waiting to sell their 4 pounds each. Ever notice the stock market report? It sure ain't the labor report. Jobless Recovery=working people don't recover, only the financial sector recovers (retains the ability to make money to make money off of the employed). Keep fighting with your working neighbors while the deadbeats on Wall Street bleed us all dry.


User_Name: Kim
Date: Tuesday June 10, 2014
Time: 06:21 PM

Messages

Hey dudes, there are legal and jurisdictional issues here regarding USFS policy, particularly in another state and the closing of certain national forests and districts to commercial picking for certain mushrooms at certain times of the year. Does the Forest Service in Idaho care about the well being or profits of a private mushroom buying company in Oregon? Should they? I mean are they supposed to take this companies well being into consideration when making forest policy decisions? I expect to hear all kinds of wailing and crying about "what about the poor pickers" with this post but the poor pickers have been and are being, exploited by the companies themselves so that would be an empty position to take.


User_Name: Vern
Date: Tuesday June 10, 2014
Time: 05:33 PM

Messages

Well, here's my thoughts as somebody who was gathering mushrooms before most of the people around now were even born! LOL! I think the companies have had it real good for a long time. I also think their business model is very fragile at this point. Sure it's made some of them big money but like somebody else said global warming has really screwed with the reliability of the seasons and harvests. Maybe too much rain falls all at once or maybe no rain comes at all and at the worst possible time. Everybody knows this has already been happening for years now and so do you just block out what you already know and have seen and just think happy thoughts for the future? I don't think so. Yeah, the mushroom companies have had it good but nature is the real decider of what will happen.Asfar as skilled, professional, commercial harvesters goes there aren't may around that's for sure. I see mostly simple,poor, and some downright desperate people who have been fed stories about big money picking mushrooms and other people, fast buck types who care only about the money, like some Mexicans. The know nothing about nature and don't care. Some leave trash laying around, beer bottles and juice cans. If I had my way they wouldn't even be allowed in our forests simply because they don't respect it. This commercial mushroom thing is fragile alright and there aint a damn thing any buyer or company can do about any of it.


User_Name: Iron Mike
Date: Tuesday June 10, 2014
Time: 03:58 PM

Messages

I think I was pretty clear and plain spoken with my thoughts on the subject. Maybe you could take another gander at what I wrote to help. Hey look people this isn't rocket science, it's actually very easy to understand.........No regular, or at least predictable, crops of mushrooms due to climate change and other factors means no pickers............and if there are no mushroom or pickers there is certainly no need for field buyers to go set up shop anywhere. Not to mention that sooner or later even the morons who work for nothing picking and selling their finds should be expected to wake up, if for no other reason than simple survival, you cant live and eat on no money 8 or 9 months or more out of the year.. and you cant just vanish from a regular job whenever a buyer calls and wants you to run to the woods and get them some mushrooms for a few weeks! lol. The facts make clear a very not secure and uncertain future for sure no matter what your personal opinion is. It would be good to remember this wild mushroom picking/buying/selling thing has been changing from day one and continues to change. I expect at some point the entire model now in use will change, possible a forced change as a result of outside forces, unexpected and beyond the companies control. In a way that's already happening, not as an event but a process as a result of usfs policies currently in force isn't it?.


User_Name: Jack
Date: Tuesday June 10, 2014
Time: 01:46 PM

Messages

Ok I get it. Like if I tell a "story" long enough it will become a fact.


User_Name: Carla
Date: Tuesday June 10, 2014
Time: 01:35 PM

Messages

Chuck, that is not only true it is gospel!!! :-)


User_Name: Carla
Date: Tuesday June 10, 2014
Time: 01:33 PM

Messages

Iron Mike, As one of the buyers I can say what I mean when I say the Circuit but I can't speak for others. We have a list of people that we refer to as circuit pickers whom we call to let know when we are in a good area that they can make some cash in. When we are on the circuit, that means we are just traveling around to places and finding the best places that we know how to.


User_Name: Jack
Date: Tuesday June 10, 2014
Time: 01:25 PM

Messages

Mushroom companies and our land ? Huh? I like how you not so skillfully rolled privately owned corporate entities - mushroom companies - into the general populace's public forests with that "our lands." Cleverspeak: that strange garbage that comes out of the mouths of bs artists, usually meant to lead your thinking and shape your perspective.


User_Name: Mad morel
Date: Tuesday June 10, 2014
Time: 01:23 PM

Messages

There's still money in mushrooms but it depends on how you go about making that money from mushrooms. you don't need to pick them to make money!.


User_Name: Handy J
Date: Tuesday June 10, 2014
Time: 12:15 PM

Messages

I think that's a great idea then after we use them to get the usfs straightened out we can get rid of them so the average public can have their forests back from the slave wage, for profit, private companies who send their lackeys out in mass to clean out the forest. Ha Ha!


User_Name: jd
Date: Tuesday June 10, 2014
Time: 11:38 AM

Messages

Mushroom companies better make phone calls to Forest Service. They are closing all our lands.


User_Name: Austin
Date: Tuesday June 10, 2014
Time: 10:20 AM

Messages

Chuck - you have hit the nail on the head. Time management and research makes all the difference. If you do your work like a professional then you will succeed, whatever it is. Vacations down south are "THINKING" and family time. Got to go - too busy drying tons.


User_Name: Iron Mike
Date: Tuesday June 10, 2014
Time: 09:05 AM

Messages

Hey one thing everybody should understand at this point is there really isn't any "mushroom circuit" where a bunch of happy gypsy's or nomadic tribesmen travel around merrily picking mushrooms across the country. It's a complete fiction -- Thanks to forest service policy in various states, climate change and the economics involved. You cant pick mushrooms where it's prohibited. You cant pick mushrooms where the weather isn't cooperating and doesn't produce mushrooms and you cant live on sub-poverty income. Why some people keep harping on this "mushroom circuit" baloney is beyond me. I sure don't get why the Mexican field workers keep trying to make money at this either. They are all about two things: work and money. They are far better off with a full time gig, for better money, on a farm.


User_Name: Handy J
Date: Tuesday June 10, 2014
Time: 08:11 AM

Messages

I had a pretty good spring for Morels and got about 5 pounds dry more than enough for a while. I don't care for the filed workers and mobs of boat people.


User_Name: Chuck
Date: Tuesday June 10, 2014
Time: 05:42 AM

Messages

Something I have noticed about pickers that do well enough to vacation in the south in the winter. They do well at everything they do and can easily have many 100 pound plus days. Achievers achieve at everything they do.


User_Name: Mad morel
Date: Tuesday June 10, 2014
Time: 12:24 AM

Messages

They're here and now you gotta learn to live with it or get out of the business.


User_Name: wild side
Date: Monday June 09, 2014
Time: 08:34 PM

Messages

PORCINI, look for their buddies. I've noticed King Boletes hang out with Fly Agaricus. and ... BYPASS the middleman. Find your own markets to sell fresh, then dry and sell or eat, trade, what have you for later.


User_Name: Jack Stone
Date: Monday June 09, 2014
Time: 06:39 PM

Messages

Ya I have to say again I was really shocked by the people I saw at jack creek mushroom camp this spring. I hadn't been there in a long time and boy things have changed as far as the people. There were the field and farm workers, Mexicans probably or from central America or thereabouts. Asians of course and a smattering of what I would call a mix of wino's- bums and okies and I don't mean that in a bad way necessarily. It's just that some reminded me of people trying to get out of real work and ending up working way harder than a regular job, for little or no money as their result. Same goes for most of the Mexicans, they were clearly trying and working their asses off and exhausted at days end, but the money wasn't coming in for them for the most part. No doubt in my mind they would be better off picking any kind of crops rather than looking for morels and I had to wonder what are they doing there? Surely they can get better work on a farm! my guess would be somebody put bs their heards with fairy tales of big money but their wasn't any happiness on anybody's faces in the camp. Just dirty and exhausted, one and all. Two people struck me who were selling their days haul of boletes - one woman mayby 40ish who got 50 dollars for a hard days work and an old man mid 60's maybe, who made only 16 dollars. Ok maybe they aren't good pickers and it wasn't a real good year but what the hell were they even doing there!!!? My god, the camp was truly depressing, nothing like years ago when you could make money picking mushrooms and the people who did it were a little better off economically, not bottom wrung, desperate and poorly suited for the work. Even the best Asian pickers where lucky to maybe crack a hundred bucks for a dawn to dark day and that alone tells you something, these are the standard of pickers everybody else compares themselves to, not lazy bums but skilled and determined, motivated pro's. So that's what I saw and I cant help but wonder where this is all going, I'm pretty sure most those people left poorer and worse of then when they got there! Commercial mushroom pickers....ha ha that's not even funny anymore!


User_Name: Ron
Date: Monday June 09, 2014
Time: 10:07 AM

Messages

Jack, Most of the so-called commercial mushroom pickers will go back to the fields to harvest berries and vegetables which is where they should have stayed in the first place and would have made more money for sure. Mexican ones anyway. The Asians just seem to vanish except the few who are true professionals who will go to the last one or two spring areas. The few white folk who are pros jump in and out when there's money in it and have other sources of income. Funny story - I saw for myself first hand how unskilled some of the socalled commercial pickers are this spring while out foraging for some boletes. One crew of Mexicans 4 guys had no idea what boletes were and were just walking right by them looking for morels. I was with a friend a far enough behnd them to figure out what was going one, somebody had showed them what morels look like and they went looking for them even though there were few around, while obviously knowing nothing about boletes which were in abundance. This is the sad state of affairs of the so-called commercial picking crews nowadays. And yes, the buyer for their morels was buying boletes too.


User_Name: Jack Stone
Date: Monday June 09, 2014
Time: 08:06 AM

Messages

I read on one website where there will not be any commercial picking allowed on any of the burns in Idaho Or Montana. I thought wow how can that be? Then I went to every national forest website in those states and sure enough, they all make it very clear no commercial picking is allowed. Then I got to thinking.....Where will all the commercial pickers go and what will they do until fall, assuming there is a fall season of course.I dont think there are nearly as many people as there was years ago who try to make money off picking mushrooms. I was at jack creek a few weeks ago and there were maybe 100 people there total and it looked like a bum camp with bums not a gathering of professional pickers like back in the old days (20 yrs ago)


User_Name: Kim
Date: Sunday June 08, 2014
Time: 05:40 PM

Messages

Does anybody think restoring the bio-diversity in our forests and allowing them to recover is a bad idea? What about the artificially induced enormous crops of a few kinds of mushrooms as a result of tampering with the natural balance? Yellow Chanterelles for one have increased massively as a result of clear cutting of other species including Cedar, then re-planting with mostly douglas fir, which they prefer. There will certainly be less of them if a balance is eventually restored but I don't think anybody would mind that except the private, for profit, commercial interests who make a lot of money off the current situation- the mushroom companies.


User_Name: Paul Stanley
Date: Sunday June 08, 2014
Time: 12:23 PM

Messages

Guess I got cut ff there..........So anyway going for ward I believe it will be much more difficult to con the American public into doing in the future whats been done in the pasy with regards to responsible forest management and this will improve everything including the long term health of all the mushroom species and the diversity found within our national forests.


User_Name: Paul Stanley
Date: Sunday June 08, 2014
Time: 12:18 PM

Messages

Ron hit the nail on the head. The biodiversity of the forests has been tampered with and damaged as a result of modern mechanized logging practices. Replanting a forest for the best interest of commercial entities isn't what we should have been doing and we know that now. I liken what's happened to the same effect as a forest fire that leaves tiny areas of unburned islands where the soil structure remains. Tiny as these may be in relation to the tens or even hundreds of thousands of acres devoided of life by the fire, they are the "mother ground" the forest life and mushrooms regenerate from. But this process takes a very long time. The old estimates were around 100 years to make one inch of viable forest topsoil the would support the kind of plant life you need to get back to where we need to be, although most of todays scientists agree this estimate varies depending on many factors. Some areas may gain an inch in 20 years and others may take 100 or more. Bottom line - As science has advanced and the understanding thereof has inproved we need to behave accordingly. In other words we need to the thinks that are important now, and in the future based on todays and the future's science, not the science of the 40's 50's or 60's. Obviously, that science doesn't fit todays world of the facts as we now understand them. Nor did it take into consideration climate change. Projecting past performance into future expectations for almost everything is a fools logic and it's my belief the so called forest managers have known for a very long time their future projections relating to sustainability of the logging of the forests was, completely unsustainable. In fact it was simply a con job sold to a gullible public and done in the best interests of private for profit corporations (logging and timber companies) with no real regard for responsible management of the publicly owned ational forests. We can see this all very clearly, in hindsight. The facts apeak for themselves. Soils compaction and destruction of the forest topsoil is something your average high school student understands nwow so going foreward I


User_Name: Woody
Date: Saturday June 07, 2014
Time: 08:56 PM

Messages

The biggest determining factor of volume is the magnitude, duration and quality of the flush. This applies to all mushrooms. Nobody can get volume that doesn't exist. Again, climate change plays an increasingly bigger role here.


User_Name: Austin
Date: Saturday June 07, 2014
Time: 07:55 PM

Messages

Elite buyers get extra commission and bigger volume. When there is a number of buyers in one area, there is always one that stands out from the others with much higher volume. They can get a little extra from the company because they get volume from their pickers. If you can't make a good wage for the time spent buying then it is best for you if you get another job. Everyone including Elite buyers should have an 'off season' income non mushroom related because you never know .


User_Name: Woody
Date: Saturday June 07, 2014
Time: 06:24 PM

Messages

Hey Austin, I have no idea where you get your "information" but this isn't the 90's anymore, the big money is gone from mushrooms for everyone except the company owners, and the field buyers are lucky to make their car and house payments and eat year round off the commission they make. The migrant-slave wage crews cant live off three or four months income and that's in a good year, which is why so many are one food stamps etc.. Another case of the working public supporting slave wage companies through corporate welfare. Oh and in case you haven't noticed, good mushroom years come less and less regularly thanks to climate change-global warming. A field buyers future is very uncertain and not at all secure for a number of reasons.


User_Name: Kim
Date: Saturday June 07, 2014
Time: 05:40 PM

Messages

None of the type of buyers Woody talked about or, any I have ever known of, or heard of for that matter are anywhere near wintering in Mexico. They are as much a prisoner of the company as the slave wage pickers who willfully stay impoverished, since most country buyers cant actually do something that would pay anything other than minimum wage. Btw - Most pickers would be better off keeping their full time field worker/migrant worker gig rather than running after mushrooms, lured by tall tales of big money spread by the fantasy mushroom group and the companies.


User_Name: Austin
Date: Saturday June 07, 2014
Time: 02:26 PM

Messages

No matter how smart a buyer is, making a living by working in the forest in a sustainable manner beats working in a stinky city any day. Being honest and fair makes all the difference. Spending the Winters in Mexico is also nice.


User_Name: Vern
Date: Saturday June 07, 2014
Time: 10:21 AM

Messages

Oh Woody! That's funny (and true) but not very nice though. I will admit, I have wondered in the back of my mind occasionally when talking to a buyer; What would this nit-wit be doing if it weren't for somebody setting him up as a "buyer" ? Hey here's some free advice for all those who don't feel like they got their share of the awesome crop of morels we had this spring; Try harder next year! Or did you forget mushroom harvesting is hard work?!


User_Name: Joel_Bolete
Date: Saturday June 07, 2014
Time: 08:38 AM

Messages

Lol. Thanks Shroom girl, Do i need to dig for them on the beach too?? Ill check out the videos, thanks. I researched that Kinds enjoy the borders around higher elevation heather meadows where clumps of trees still collect. I will need to find out the species of tree but i am sure it is hemlock, pine, spruce. Bull fuckets all!


User_Name: Woody
Date: Saturday June 07, 2014
Time: 06:58 AM

Messages

If you think mushroom pickers aint the brightest bulbs take a look at the field buyers! If commercial harvesting is ever banned in Or/Wa There will be a sudden jump in applications for car wash attendant, drive thru window at taco bell and valet parking. Lol! Which is the education/skill level of a lot of the field buyers. Actually the companies seem to have recruited the rural, redneck with a 4th grade education almost exclusively, with a few exceptions of course. more lol-ing..................


User_Name: garf
Date: Saturday June 07, 2014
Time: 02:31 AM

Messages

oppss guess i need this ger_takeaguess@hotmail.com .....subject mushrooms


User_Name: garf
Date: Saturday June 07, 2014
Time: 02:29 AM

Messages

ok heres one as i am hoping for a trip too and sooner than later. I am looking for someone who has the setup for a serious morel pick .. i am talking pack frames , baskets , buckets , drying racks or better... looking to buy in vancouver area ... pack frames must be comfy and capable of four or five baskets high at least....food grade buckets ,five gallon with lids and drilled out air holes ..just curious before i go spend on new if anyone has this and wants to sell..e-mail me also a gps like simple to go with my compass...preferably a bushnell backtrack.... Joel Bolete my idea is there is already enough squirrels in the woods ...and heres one for the king bolete habitat ... check out UNTAMED FEAST videos on you tube


User_Name: shroomgirl
Date: Saturday June 07, 2014
Time: 12:05 AM

Messages

Joel_Bolete, Keep an eye out in the early fall around the beach. Meanwhile, elsewhere.........we are all still hoping for a significant showing of morels............. Full buckets ya'll!!


User_Name: Joel_Bolete
Date: Friday June 06, 2014
Time: 06:15 PM

Messages

I have the "public" zone for newb wannabe mushroom pickers sorted out. I just wanted some infor on habitat details for my own research. I'm the last one that wants to go stealing spots here. I have found all my patches and I plan to keep them quiet. I am struggling with the King, I would love to be able to find, document, identify, and mark for my own personal mushroom picking life. AS FOR TOURING GROUPS>>> WE NEED ALL THE PICKERS AND OUTDOORS MINDED INDIVIDUALS WE CAN GET CONSIDERING OUR HABITAT IS DYING AROUND US AT AN ALARMING RATE> so lets not get all holy about it...


User_Name: mtn morels
Date: Friday June 06, 2014
Time: 02:02 PM

Messages

mushroom pickerz aint the brightest bulbs in the drawer...


User_Name: mushroom bandit
Date: Friday June 06, 2014
Time: 11:44 AM

Messages

will you guys stop your bickering. i'm trying to plan a picking trip, and sorting thro all this is mentally exhausting.!!!


User_Name: garf
Date: Friday June 06, 2014
Time: 07:17 AM

Messages

Ya help a guy out that says he wants to do guided tours for shrooming....lol funny man....


User_Name: Joel_Bolete
Date: Thursday June 05, 2014
Time: 09:41 PM

Messages

Jihad anyone? People these days always looking for something to fight(jihad) about, for, on, what ever. Respect universally. Thats what im saying. Now Back to mush! I have not been able to find the King yet, 4 years and counting. This year I am on the hunt again. Can anyone help me with some basic feild information about the King bolete, boletus edilus, the porcini. Like: elevation, tree cover, season, time of year, rains, the gps coordinates to a good patch? full buckets!


User_Name: Lobo
Date: Thursday June 05, 2014
Time: 07:47 PM

Messages

I agree with defender, one ought not be judged on their abilities in communication or even typing ability. Our friend has abilities that are not always apparent, he has a discussion board here that is named after him and has an infinite knowledge of mushrooms learned from hands-on experience. He served his country honorably in war and is disabled as a result, I don't always agree with him but he is a nice guy and a true friend.


User_Name: Steve from Oregon
Date: Thursday June 05, 2014
Time: 06:58 PM

Messages

Well my Morel season has sucked here in NW Oregon NE as well. Hope you all have had better luck.


User_Name: defender
Date: Thursday June 05, 2014
Time: 04:27 PM

Messages

Please ...Don't judge a book by it's cover. Likewise don't judge a person by their spelling..... Having said that, There is a lot more substance and wisdom coming from that quarter, Than you have a right to understand. Take off your blinders, and give your head a shake..... Was your post not a "rant" ?


User_Name: mikenmatt
Date: Thursday June 05, 2014
Time: 03:59 PM

Messages

This used to be a good site,until guys like mad morel started ranting,yes you are the best mad morel,so why don't you quit blabbing and go pick,p.s picker is not spelled like picture.


User_Name: little
Date: Wednesday June 04, 2014
Time: 04:46 PM

Messages

where are there mushroom picking.


User_Name: Ron
Date: Wednesday June 04, 2014
Time: 07:26 AM

Messages

Mike is right, as usual, on all counts. The Rim Fire was a good example of the local Ranger dist head cheese behaving as though he owned the land. There was no scientific reason not to allow harvest of morels even though it wouldn't have been a good crop anyway since the area was in drought. It was simply a case of just one govt employee on a power trip...It has really been an issue with me for many years the Forest Circus and their clowns have bent over for every logging company that came along while hassleing the ordinary public for any little thing. Buying mushroom permits is a policy, but after the destruction wrought by 40 plus years of clearcutting and slash and burning of the ground afterwards, hardly any of the mother ground remains to produce future mushroom production. Sadly nobody will ever be held responsible.


User_Name: random information
Date: Wednesday June 04, 2014
Time: 06:25 AM

Messages

I apologize if I was being disrespectful in regards to First Nations land traversing and picking in my earlier comments. It would be fantastic if we could one day live as one in this beautiful land. As for not picking on that land they'll have to flag a line through the forest if they're gonna be stiklers about it.


User_Name: wild side
Date: Wednesday June 04, 2014
Time: 05:27 AM

Messages

try to ignore the negativity and focus on the positive. try to educate and share knowledge where you see fit. sadly for them, there's a lot of anger out there for unknown reasons but some people will surprise you. stay cool and happy trails.


User_Name: Mad morel
Date: Wednesday June 04, 2014
Time: 03:26 AM

Messages

If you are referring to me as the dumbass for saying don't wish for fall too soon then I'm sorry your mother never taught you good manners. you don't know who I am and you probably don't care but one day your gonna want some information. and I might be the right person for that you just got yourself a black mark I don't come on here very often nowadays I'm too busy in the woods and I won't say what kind of pic her I am because its none of your business but I do believe I'm a better picture than you are and a lot more well mannered. that's all I have to say on the subject.........Mad Morel.


User_Name: Joel_Bolete
Date: Tuesday June 03, 2014
Time: 08:46 PM

Messages

Boletus_Joe: Who is Chris???


User_Name: Joel_Bolete
Date: Tuesday June 03, 2014
Time: 08:44 PM

Messages

Boletus_Joe: I have NOT taken groups on wild edible tours to my tested patches. that would be stupid! Not to mention hard on my wallet. Stanley park sounds like a good idea. lol. Nice call. How about aldergrove park? haha


User_Name: Mad morel
Date: Tuesday June 03, 2014
Time: 08:43 PM

Messages

Well my son a,steinborn Jr. you have learned a lot from me actually just when I thought you were never listening you were actually listening and learning. your mother and I are very proud of you and it has been some time since I've been on just bored so many of you might lear n something from the little guy


User_Name: madmorel
Date: Tuesday June 03, 2014
Time: 08:18 PM

Messages

I would not wish for fall so soon.


User_Name: Iron Mike
Date: Tuesday June 03, 2014
Time: 06:29 AM

Messages

Oh btw- I read where the U.S Forest Dis-Service and the clowns who hang out there every day for the big bucks then a fat govt pension for life after they retire is getting some bad Press. I say it's about time. For too long that bloated agency has been controlled by the corportations who logged (laid waste) to the PUBLICLY OWNED National Forests and now they wont even let the American public pick mushrooms in whats left of their own national forests. Somebody needs to do an intervention there for sure and re-work that agency into one that makes decisions based on REAL SCIENCE, not the fake kind they used as an excuse to log off all the old growth and turn the public land into a corporate tree farm. Why is it that the head cheese of every separate national forest acts like they own it? For a long time I have a had the feeling they really don't want the public even enjoying their own property and now they act like THEY own the place? OMG.


User_Name: Iron Mike
Date: Tuesday June 03, 2014
Time: 06:14 AM

Messages

Well, we have a nice supply of excellent quality dried Morels both naturals and Conica and sliced and dried Spring Kings now, compliments of mother earth and good May weather. And a little hard work! Now were waiting for fall to see what pops up. Get it...? Pops UP! Ha HA HA!!!!!!!!


User_Name: Boletus Joe
Date: Monday June 02, 2014
Time: 10:23 AM

Messages

"If I wanted to do forage tours and picking groups for a fee," Hmmmmm.... My advice to you would be... "watch your back" Of course depending where you plan on doing this activity. I to live in Canada, and have been picking for over 40 years. That being said, I would not be to happy about seeing someone taking tours (groups) of people out to find shrooms. I would suggest if you did so maybe take them to Stanley Park. or maybe a well known "Granny Patch" I didn't know Chris had kin in Canada...... just sayin'


User_Name: visioncreation
Date: Monday June 02, 2014
Time: 05:19 AM

Messages

I have seen more helvella and verpa than any year in the past.... anyone else seeing them in profusion? I am in the Columbia valley. That being said it has been a good year for blonde naturals all over too. Same where you are?


User_Name: Joel_Bolete
Date: Sunday June 01, 2014
Time: 08:30 PM

Messages

Thanks for the replies! Sry Im in Vancouver Canada. I am sure that if I have an attorney make me a liability waiver for the guided newb tours that should cover that. In regards to selling wold edibles to markets and restaurants, has this ever come back to bite anyone in your areas? or travels?


User_Name: North 60 Hunter
Date: Sunday June 01, 2014
Time: 07:34 PM

Messages

Joel_Bolete: If you're taking money to guide shroomer wannabe's in the bush, then you aught to have a license and insurance; otherwise it all comes out of your pocket, until there is no more, if anything goes wrong. Probably more so in the States.


User_Name: JDS
Date: Sunday June 01, 2014
Time: 04:23 PM

Messages

Joel_Bolete...It would be nice to at least know what country you're in!!! You need to talk to an attorney who deals in the type of concerns you have.


User_Name: Joel_Bolete
Date: Sunday June 01, 2014
Time: 10:55 AM

Messages

Hello peeps. Question: Do I need a business license to sell commercially to farmers markets and kitchens the wild mushrooms that I collect? Is it a good idea to create a business ID for tax purposes and write offs? If I wanted to do forage tours and picking groups for a fee, would I need a business license to remain safe from liability if people fall, get hurt, or eat a mushroom I told them not to?


May